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What it took to get us to stay

5 December 2022

The top reasons for staying with a company include pay, training and schedules.

Pouring over data, analysing trends and evaluating the efficacy of policies are often how companies study their retention efforts. While those methods offer insights, the best resource for finding out why employees stay at their jobs is to ask them.

IW did that and spoke with three entry-level workers in different industries. Here are their responses as to what they like about their jobs and why they have stayed.

Chris – mechanical technician, steel manufacturer

The reason I have stuck around here is that when I was hired, I wasn’t the highest-rated mechanic, and they were willing to train me by sending me to workshops and school so I can improve at my job. I especially like that I have a clear career path and know that I have a way to grow with the company and always keep moving forward.

The learning process is very much a personal choice here. The management doesn’t sit you down and have those conversations with you, after the initial probation period. It’s pretty much up to you to ask managers for the information that lets you acquire new skills. After completing certain courses, you go back to managers so they can evaluate your work and see if you’re ready to go to the next level.

It’s not just me, I see this with my fellow workers. Mechanics work their way up through the ranks and then from there, they have the option of going to management if they desire or they can go somewhere else in the company and learn something new.

As far as other things I like about this job is that I can work as much as I want. There is no limit on overtime. The pay is good and there are obvious ways for me to increase it if I want more.

In terms of where I think the company goes the extra mile, to me, it’s the way they look at safety and how they treat the people. At our facility, a lot of dangerous things are involved in the processes and we constantly have safety training. Still, things happened and people do inevitably get hurt –I was recently burned pretty badly a few months ago.

The company reacted and has pretty much rebuilt the entire system which was the cause of my injury. They added dozens of extra fail-safes to the system to make sure what happened to me doesn’t happen to somebody else. And while I was out of work and in the hospital, they made sure I was taken care of. I didn’t have to worry about my livelihood or anything while I was healing.

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Source: industryweek

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