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Top five shifts affecting construction

1 June 2021

Construction has long been plagued by a lack of collaboration and communication right along the supply chain, according to construction payment application firm Payapps. Over time, this leads to job fragmentation, inefficient contract approaches and disputes over claims.

Yet, construction companies that meet these challenges head-on by remaining agile, adapting faster and manage to reduce their cost base will see better productivity gains, leading to a greater competitive edge.

Through 2020, Covid-19 accelerated the much-needed changes in construction but what’s the long-term impact and what does a connected construction workplace of the future look like? The construction ecosystem of the future will be highly standardised, consolidated—both vertically and horizontally—and integrated.

According to a global survey conducted by Payapps, in partnership with international research firm Frost & Sullivan, the top five shifts affecting the construction workplace of the future across New Zealand and Australia are:

Supply chain transformation: 55%

Real-time collaboration across the supply chain, coupled with the digitisation of products and processes, will only strengthen the relationship between head contractors and those they work with.

The construction industry itself is often highly fragmented, with workers, engineers and equipment being distributed across massive worksites, with plenty of offsite stakeholders to consider too. This is where digital tools come into their own.

It’s critical to choose construction software that complement each other within a best-of-breed ecosystem or synchronise with a centralised platform to ensure a single source of truth.

It’s also important to implement tools that are aligned to specific processes to ensure deadlines or requirements, such as compliance with state-based security of payment legislation, are adhered to and not impacted by bottlenecks or poor transparency across the supply chain.

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