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SCA test-drives centipede forest machine

5 March 2023

SCA has been test-driving the Centipede concept machine, which Komatsu and eight Swedish forestry companies are jointly developing. The machine is seen as the sustainable forest machine of the future and combines lower soil compaction, increased productivity and better work environment.

The work to develop the Centipede machine is one of forestry’s most important development projects where the issue of sustainability is central. The machine is intended to be able to meet the climate of the future and the challenges arising from increasingly shorter periods of frozen grounds.

“The machine is gentler on the environment and the driver, while at the same time we get a more efficient flow of timber and can access wet areas even during the bare ground season, without causing ground damage”, says Magnus Bergman, head of technology and digitalization at SCA Skog and chairman of the project’s steering group.

During autumn 2022, Skogforsk carried out a number of different test runs on different types of land. And in December, the machine went on tour with the participating companies to further be tested in different environments. SCA was the first to test drive it.

“We have tested the Centipede in more practical field trials to see how it performs when driven in more operational conditions. During our test period, there was both severe cold and thawing weather, a winter weather that was both icy and with “clumpy” snow, i.e. crammed snow. We also compared the Centipede with a regular forwarder to see if the Centipede produces less ground impact as intended. And our tests looked very promising”, says Magnus.

During the time that the machine was driven on SCA land in the Sollefteå district, the two drivers were able to forward approx. 2,230 m3 of wood. Behind the Centipede project is SCA, Södra, Sveaskog, Holmen, Norra Skog, Mellanskog, Stora Enso and BillerudKorsnäs, as well as the forest machinery manufacturer Komatsu Forest. The project was established 2019.

Source: SCA

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