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Residues to Revenues 2022 event announced

15 September 2021

For New Zealand and Australia, it’s been over 8 years since a wood residues programme has been run by FIEA showcasing new innovations around harvesting, bio-fuel handling and transport technologies.

Because of the huge interest being shown right now by forest owners and wood harvesting contractors in extracting wood bio-fuels to supply the ever-increasing demand from large industrial scale heat or energy users, a wood residues event, Residues to Revenues 2022 has been set up to run in Rotorua, New Zealand on 9-10 March 2022.

In addition to case studies of early adopters of in-field chipping and delivery systems, successful systems being employed from outside this region will be showcased along with some pretty innovative business models that have been adopted elsewhere to ensure regional suppliers of bio-fuels are able to provide a timely and consistent quality fuel to end larger end users.

This well overdue event is aimed at forest owners and managers, logging and wood transport operators who are looking right now at opportunities of extracting and processing forestry slash and logging waste from their wood harvesting operations along with sawmilling and wood manufacturing companies who are looking at options to better utilise their wood waste streams.

The event will include a one-day conference, a pre-conference in-field chipping technology showcase where new and emerging technologies for processing forest slash, logging residues and stump wood will be outlined by major equipment suppliers from around the world and a post conference workshop run by the Bioenergy Association of NZ. In this, further details on quality and delivery requirements for wood fuels to larger scale industrial heat and energy plant users will be discussed.

Further details will follow but early information including the planned programme can now be found on the event website, www.woodresidues.events

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