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Re-imagining the forest products supply chain

29 July 2021

In the latest episode of FWPA’s WoodChat podcast series, listeners will hear about a research project that took an in-depth look at the various elements of Australia’s log and woodchip export supply chain, and how it can most effectively be managed.

The team behind the comprehensive FWPA-supported study reviewed optimum conditions for logs during storage, haulage and at ports. Their findings are now being used to identify solutions and innovations for an enhanced and more cost-effective timber export process.

Dr Mohammad-Reza Ghaffariyan of the University of the Sunshine Coast, who oversaw the multi-pronged project, said there had been a lack of research into the forestry industry’s export supply chain in Australia and globally. “We wanted to identify and implement innovative methods, technologies and management practices to help build a more efficient and sustainable supply chain in Australia, with a particular focus on exports,” Dr Ghaffariyan said.

Extensive industry consultation was undertaken with a steering committee comprising representatives from 12 partner organisations to determine the most important and relevant research activities. These activities were then progressed to the research and testing phase.

During the episode, hosts Sam and Georgia speak to a number of researchers involved with various aspects of the project. These include the potential benefits of various tag, track and trace systems, and the accuracy of automated measurement methods for stacked logs on trucks.

The researchers also discuss work around the impacts of factors such as debarking and storage location on moisture content and sapstain incidence in pine log stacks, as well as the potential of wood loading technologies and the use of containers at port.

WoodChat represents FWPA’s ongoing commitment to engaging ways of communicating news and innovations to the industry and beyond. Each episode includes in-depth conversations with experts on recent discoveries and current initiatives.

You can listen to WoodChat on Soundcloud, iTunes and Spotify.

Via Soundcloud

Source: FWPA

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