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A 5G roading solution for forestry roading

25 May 2020

In New Zealand, there are many forests with thousands of km’s of roading spread widely across both islands, with many different types of soils and clays. Some are great for building roads on and others, not so great. Some of these roads require cut to waste and backfilling or thick pavement depths to bridge the poor sub-grades including the use of geotextiles.

This adds cost and time to a project. Even with thicker pavements and geotextiles the poor sub-grades still exist. Improving the strength of the sub-grade can be done using a product called PolyCom Stabilising Aid. It’s already been used successfully for over 15 years to stabilize mining haul roads, council roads, remote airstrips, earthworks, hardstand areas, and forestry roads around the world.

PolyCom Stabilising Aid is a very concentrated dry spread granular polyacrylamide that will mix with soil, clay, and low-quality aggregates to form a hard but flexible water-resistant pavement that will reduce dust, potholes, corrugations and blowouts in the wet. Treated roads require a lot less on-going maintenance than your existing pavement construction, saving many hours of re-work and maintenance down the track giving bottom-line savings to the forest owner.

An independent carbon study on PolyCom road stabilising in Australia showed that the use of PolyCom reduces carbon by 6,383 kg per km of treated road. This reduction has been counted from the mining in the quarry through to the placement of aggregate on the road.

All that is required to construct a PolyCom pavement is a small amount of plant, a grader with rear-mounted scarifiers, a water cart, and a roller. Production rates of 1000 lm x 4m in a single day are the norm. For further information visit; www.tpms.co.nz.

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